Bollard spacing for active travel accessibility

What is the maximum gap between bollards that will keep car and van drivers off a walking/wheeling and cycling route?

What is the minimum gap between access point bollards that will enable Disabled people and others using larger cycle types to use a cycle routes?

What bollard spacing is used to prevent people using vehicles as weapons to attack buildings and busy public spaces?

It’s not surprising that sometimes people are confused about how bollards should be installed in different situations!

We’ve put this graphic together to show that bollards spaced with gaps of 1.5m to 1.7m will prevent any modern cars from getting onto a cycle route, while providing access to Disabled people using larger cycle types.

The barriers used to prevent casual driving onto walking/wheeling and cycling routes are different from the hostile vehicle security barriers that are installed near some buildings and to protect busy pedestrian spaces. Vehicle security barriers are installed with 1.2m maximum spacing. Accessible cycle routes cannot pass through these barriers.

Access widths for people, cycles and vehicles
Scaled diagrams showing straight-line single-point access widths: Minimum route widths are much wider than these dimensions.
Hostile vehicle anti-terrorist bollards 1.2m maximum spacing
Diagrams show 1.2m gap bollards, person with assistance dog, 1.1m width, person with double buggy 0.8m width, person with rollator and two children, wider than 1.2m.
LTN 1/20 1.5m minimum bollard spacing for cycle routes
Diagrams show 1.5m gap bollards, side-by-side tandem or Cycle Design Vehicle 1.2m wide, classic 1960s mini 1.41-1.56m wide – mini loses wing mirrors if driven through 1.5m bollard gaps.
Wider 1.7m bollard spacing
Diagrams show small car 1.65-1.90m loses wing mirrors to pass through 1.7m bollards, standard car 1.80-2.00m wide, SUV 1.90-2.10m wide, van 1.90-2.50m wide.
No cars or vans fit through 1.5m spaced bollards
Modern cars do not fit through 1.7m spaced bollards
My Cycle My Mobility Aid and Wheels for Wellbeing logos, signature Kate Ball for WfW

References for dimensions used in this graphic are here.

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